Sat. Dec 4th, 2021

Overlaid images of Jupiters pole from NASAs satellite Juno and NASAs Chandra X-ray telescope. Left reveals a forecast of Jupiters Northern X-ray aurora (purple) overlaid on a noticeable Junocam image of the North Pole. How NASAs Juno probe to Jupiter will reveal the secrets of the solar systems most significant world The Juno probe reached Jupiter in 2016 after a five-year, 1.8 billion-mile journey from EarthThe Juno probe reached Jupiter on July 4, 2016, after a five-year, 1.8 billion-mile (2.8 bn km) journey from Earth.Following a successful braking manoeuvre, it entered into a long polar orbit flying to within 3,100 miles (5,000 km) of the planets swirling cloud tops.The probe skimmed to within simply 2,600 miles (4,200 km) of the planets clouds once a fortnight – too close to offer international coverage in a single image.No previous spacecraft has orbited so close to Jupiter, although 2 others have been sent out plunging to their damage through its atmosphere.To complete its dangerous mission Juno survived a circuit-frying radiation storm produced by Jupiters powerful magnetic field.The maelstrom of high energy particles travelling at nearly the speed of light is the harshest radiation environment in the Solar System.To cope with the conditions, the spacecraft was secured with unique radiation-hardened wiring and sensing unit shielding.Its all-important brain – the spacecrafts flight computer – was housed in an armoured vault made of titanium and weighing practically 400 pounds (172kg).

Overlaid images of Jupiters pole from NASAs satellite Juno and NASAs Chandra X-ray telescope. Left shows a forecast of Jupiters Northern X-ray aurora (purple) overlaid on a noticeable Junocam image of the North Pole. We just knew they were produced when ions crashed into the planets environment. How NASAs Juno probe to Jupiter will reveal the secrets of the solar systems greatest planet The Juno probe reached Jupiter in 2016 after a five-year, 1.8 billion-mile journey from EarthThe Juno probe reached Jupiter on July 4, 2016, after a five-year, 1.8 billion-mile (2.8 bn km) journey from Earth.Following an effective braking manoeuvre, it entered into a long polar orbit flying to within 3,100 miles (5,000 km) of the worlds swirling cloud tops.The probe skimmed to within simply 2,600 miles (4,200 km) of the planets clouds once a fortnight – too close to supply worldwide protection in a single image.No previous spacecraft has orbited so close to Jupiter, although two others have actually been sent plunging to their damage through its atmosphere.To finish its risky mission Juno made it through a circuit-frying radiation storm produced by Jupiters powerful magnetic field.The maelstrom of high energy particles travelling at almost the speed of light is the harshest radiation environment in the Solar System.To cope with the conditions, the spacecraft was secured with special radiation-hardened wiring and sensor shielding.Its critical brain – the spacecrafts flight computer system – was housed in an armoured vault made of titanium and weighing practically 400 pounds (172kg).

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Wizadclick | WAC MAG 2021