Fri. Sep 30th, 2022

She welcomed a baby boy in June of last year.

And Katherine Ryan has revealed that her son Fred is already potty trained at just eight months of age.

The comedian, 38, took to her Instagram Stories to explain that she used the same technique that she used on her daughter Violet, now 12.

Wow! Katherine Ryan has revealed that her son Fred is already potty trained at just eight months of age

Wow! Katherine Ryan has revealed that her son Fred is already potty trained at just eight months of age

Wow! Katherine Ryan has revealed that her son Fred is already potty trained at just eight months of age

She wrote: ‘I hate to even write this because I know I’ll get backlash but for those who know about my potty training ethos and success with baby Violet…

‘Fred reliably wees on the potty at under eight months and we can count the amount of 2022 soiled nappies on one hand.

‘I didn’t know whether it would work with Fred. It does. Potty train babies before they learn to go in nappies!!! They can do it!’ 

Explanation: The comedian, 38, took to her Instagram Stories to explain that she used the same technique that she used on her daughter Violet, now 12

Explanation: The comedian, 38, took to her Instagram Stories to explain that she used the same technique that she used on her daughter Violet, now 12

Explanation: The comedian, 38, took to her Instagram Stories to explain that she used the same technique that she used on her daughter Violet, now 12

Most children are potty trained between 18 and 24 months.

Katherine previously explained how she trained Violet as a baby, telling NME: ‘My daughter wore standard nappies as a newborn. But when she started on solid foods, I could see in her face when she needed to poop.

‘I’d whip her onto the potty as quickly as possible, then celebrate after she’d been. In addition, she’d be rewarded with about an hour of nappyless nudity. Bliss.’ 

Method: She wrote: 'I hate to even write this because I know I¿ll get backlash but for those who know about my potty training ethos and success with baby Violet¿ (pictured)

Method: She wrote: 'I hate to even write this because I know I¿ll get backlash but for those who know about my potty training ethos and success with baby Violet¿ (pictured)

Method: She wrote: ‘I hate to even write this because I know I’ll get backlash but for those who know about my potty training ethos and success with baby Violet… (pictured)

It comes after Katherine detailed her tough journey with Lupus and has credited the disease for making her ‘focus on the things that matter.’

The TV personality, has described the moment that she first began to experience symptoms of the condition back in 2007 and her struggle for a diagnosis.

The Canadian had just moved to London when she first began to suffer with sore joints, fatigue and rashes.

Success: She said: 'Fred reliably wees on the potty at under 8 months and we can count the amount of 2022 soiled nappies on one hand'

Success: She said: 'Fred reliably wees on the potty at under 8 months and we can count the amount of 2022 soiled nappies on one hand'

Success: She said: ‘Fred reliably wees on the potty at under 8 months and we can count the amount of 2022 soiled nappies on one hand’

In an interview with The Mirror she explained: ‘I had really low white blood cells, but no one seemed particularly alarmed about that. There was a lot of frustration with doctors who didn’t know what was wrong and didn’t investigate. I felt quite fobbed off.’

Following various appointments with an array of specialists, she added that she was told she could have ‘ringworm’ whilst another took a guess with ‘leprosy.’

Desperately Katherine visited A&E, where a nurse there first suggested that she might have Lupus.

'Better than ever': The actress believed that stress was a contributing factor to the cause of her lupus and has since successfully managed her condition by focussing on de-stressing

'Better than ever': The actress believed that stress was a contributing factor to the cause of her lupus and has since successfully managed her condition by focussing on de-stressing

‘Better than ever’: The actress believed that stress was a contributing factor to the cause of her lupus and has since successfully managed her condition by focussing on de-stressing

After almost a year of trying to get a professional diagnosis she was finally told by a dermatologist that she had systemic lupus erythematosus.

Whilst there is no cure for the long-term condition, it can be treated and controlled with medication to prevent it from getting worse and lessen flare-ups.

After her diagnosis Katherine detailed: ‘I realised life’s not fair and I had to take responsibility for my own health. Everyone’s different, but for me it was either I calm down or I get a fever, so the reward was high. I didn’t do yoga or mindfulness techniques – I went for a lot of walks.

'Fobbed off': She detailed: 'There was a lot of frustration with doctors who didn¿t know what was wrong and didn¿t investigate' (with Fred, six months, and her partner Bobby Kootstra)

'Fobbed off': She detailed: 'There was a lot of frustration with doctors who didn¿t know what was wrong and didn¿t investigate' (with Fred, six months, and her partner Bobby Kootstra)

‘Fobbed off’: She detailed: ‘There was a lot of frustration with doctors who didn’t know what was wrong and didn’t investigate’ (with Fred, six months, and her partner Bobby Kootstra)

‘I became really Zen and focused on the things that matter. I just didn’t sweat the small stuff any more.’

The actress believed that stress was a contributing factor to the cause of her lupus and has since successfully managed her condition by focussing on de-stressing.

After suffering a series of tragic miscarriages Katherine began taking medication again in 2020, but admitted that she was ‘just guessing’ that it was an autoimmune response.

She now sharess, son, Fred, six months, with her partner Bobby and a daughter, Violet, 12, from her previous relationship as she said that she feels ‘better than ever.’

What is lupus? 

  • Lupus is a long-term condition that causes joint pain, skin rashes and tiredness. There’s no cure, but symptoms can improve if treatment starts early
  • THe main symptoms are joint and muscle pain extreme tiredness that will not go away no matter how much you rest rashes – often over the nose and cheeks 
  • Lupus often flares up (relapses) and symptoms become worse for a few weeks, sometimes longer. Symptoms then settle down (remission). The reason why symptoms flare up or settle down is not known
  • Lupus is generally treated using: anti-inflammatory medicines like ibuprofen, hydroxychloroquine for fatigue and skin and joint problems steroid tablets, injections and creams for kidney inflammation and rashes
  • Two medicines, rituximab and belimumab, are sometimes used to treat severe lupus by reducing the number of antibodies in the blood   
  • Source: NHS

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