Wed. Jun 29th, 2022

This month well get to see a Full Moon on August 22, 2021, known by some early Native American tribes of the northeastern United States, as the Sturgeon Moon. The name was offered to the Moon since the large sturgeon fish of the Great Lakes, and other significant lakes, were more easily caught at this time of year. Thats not all! We likewise get to see a Blue Moon!
Weve all heard the phrase “when in a Blue Moon,” which normally describes something that rarely takes place. Blue Moons do often occur in Earths night sky, triggering this expression. What is a Blue Moon?

Due to the fact that Junes Full Moon came simply a few days after the June (Summer) solstice, we will see four Full Moons in the present summer season, which ends at the September equinox on September 22.
Well, Blue Moons that are blue in color are incredibly uncommon and have absolutely nothing to do with the calendar or the Moons stages; they do not have to be Full Moons either. When a blue-colored Moon takes place, the blue color is the outcome of water beads in the air, particular types of clouds, or particles thrown into the environment by natural disasters, such as volcanic ash and smoke. Numerous of these ash particles can be about 1 micron in size, which might spread red light and act as a blue filter, resulting in the Moon appearing blue.
Having said all of that, what we call a Blue Moon typically appears pale grey, white or a yellow-colored color– simply like the Moon on any other night.

Well, we have 2 sort of Blue Moons– month-to-month and seasonal.
A month-to-month Blue Moon is the second Full Moon in a calendar month with 2 Full Moons. Then, theres a seasonal Blue Moon– the third Full Moon of a huge season that has four Full Moons.
In astronomy, a season is the time period in between a solstice and equinox, or vice versa. Each season– winter, summertime, fall or spring– lasts 3 months and typically has 3 Full Moons, taking place about 30 days apart. Because Junes Full Moon came just a couple of days after the June (Summer) solstice, we will see four Full Moons in the present summer season, which ends at the September equinox on September 22.
The 3rd Full Moon– our seasonal Blue Moon– will occur on August 22. All Full Moons are opposite the Sun, as seen from Earth, rising completely brightened at regional time around sundown and setting around sunrise.
Well, Blue Moons that are blue in color are very uncommon and have nothing to do with the calendar or the Moons phases; they dont have to be Full Moons either. When a blue-colored Moon occurs, the blue color is the outcome of water beads in the air, particular types of clouds, or particles thrown into the environment by natural disasters, such as volcanic ash and smoke.
In 1883, an Indonesian volcano called Krakatoa produced an eruption so large that researchers compared it to a 100-megaton nuclear bomb. Ash from the Krakatoa surge rose as high into the atmosphere as 80 kilometers (50 miles). A number of these ash particles can be about 1 micron in size, which could spread traffic signal and act as a blue filter, resulting in the Moon appearing blue.
Blue-colored Moons appeared for years following the 1883 eruption. Many other volcanoes throughout history, and even wildfires, have actually been understood to affect the color of the Moon. As a guideline of thumb, to develop a bluish Moon, dust or ash particles need to be bigger than about 0.6 micron, which scatters the red light and allows the blue light to travel through freely. Having stated all of that, what we call a Blue Moon usually appears pale grey, white or a yellow-colored color– just like the Moon on any other night.
Generally, Blue Moons take place every 2 to 3 years. Our last Blue Moon was on Oct. 31, 2020– the night of Halloween. Mars was really big and red, considering that it was closer to Earth, and it was seen in the sky near the Blue Moon. Coincidently, this years Blue Moon will appear near worlds again, however this time Jupiter and Saturn! We will not see another Blue Moon up until August 2023.

By Lance D. Davis, NASA
August 22, 2021

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Wizadclick | WAC MAG 2022